Available Pieces

OUTBURST 2009 – redwood, copper, steel base – 12’x10’x8’ $65,000
​Outburst is a surge of energy, a big splash, a raucous response. The exploration of form, mass and energy is an intuitive process. Roots are the form, the body, the muscle, the heart and the spirit of this sculpture. Shaped by the tenacious and persistent vitality of nature these roots are the impetus and inspiration for Outburst. Copper boulders represent mass. The boulders are stacked on top of big root masses, perched on the outstretched tendrils of roots, wedged within the tenacious grip of roots or hung by chain from roots or logs. I think of the log as a vector. By tapering the log I cut through layers of grain creating patterns that suggest a magnetic field or electric charge. The log penetrates form and a copper boulder hangs in space like an electron or a moon in orbit. Everything is form, mass and energy.

LOOKOUT 2015 – redwood, copper, steel – 17’x10’x8’ $94,000
In 2010 I acquired 80 tons (four 45’ truckloads) of huge salvaged redwood stumps and chunks from a landowner who had, for 20 years, moved stranded stumps from low water gravel bars to above high water. One of the largest and most spectacular specimens was the big chunk that forms the body of Lookout. As the loader operator tried to wrangle the piece toward the awaiting truck one fork slid into the center check of the tree and the stump was skewered. My first reaction was to yell, “stop!” because I feared that the loader would split the big piece in half. But, instead, I realized that we should pick the five-ton piece up with one fork stuck into the middle of the stump and shake it to see if it was sound. When the rear tires of the loader came off the ground and the piece did not break and I was confident that the “big chunk” was not fragile.

When the big chunk was off loaded in my studio I could see light through the center of the stump. I imagined an interior passage and gradually the idea of a lookout tower emerged. I knew I wanted to elevate the bug chunk to gain height and facilitate access to the interior passage. I had some large salvaged square steel tubing. Structural steel speaks industrial while the big chunk is wonderfully ancient and organic but somehow the rugged wood and the rusted steel compliment one another I began to ponder how to complete the tower and imagined an osprey or crow’s nest as a round and irregular lookout capping the platform of the vertical elevated stump. When I saw an exhibit Ann Webber’s large organic cardboard vessels I realized I could adapt her forms and process to my wood and copper materials. The result was a strange surprise. My granddaughter calls it “the jellyfish” while others see fifties sci-fi. Adaptation becomes invention. Steel structure supports a massive redwood stump. A steel ladder ascends the interior of a tree and leads to a copper lookout nest. It may be crazy but who says you need to know what you are doing to make art? Sometimes you just have to take a chance.

UPRISING 2009 – redwood, copper – 14’x9’x5’ $62,000
Uprising rises as a vertical gesture of ascension connecting earth and sky. Uprising overcomes gravity. I love the energy and vitality of big chunks of wood and work to honor their spirit. From standing stones to stacked markers, from the pyramids to the twin towers there is a primal impulse to connect earth and sky. I share this impulse. Uprising reaches skyward and creates an energy flow. We ascend to the heavens and the cosmos brings life to earth.

ROCK SLIDE 2009 – redwood, copper steel base – 8’x8’x8’ $34,000

Rock Slide is one of a series of sculptures called Uprooted. The Uprooted series shares common materials – roots, logs and copper boulders and the Uprooted series shares a common theme – the dynamic relationship of form, mass and energy. Roots are form, boulders are mass and logs are energy.
If we view our planet from the perspective of geologic time, the river canyons and the mountainsides and even the great continents are in constant motion. Rock Slide is just one frame of this inevitable motion, this artist’s attempt to understand matter.
As you move around the sculpture there are perspectives where you can feel the frozen motion and there are perspectives where it appears stable and stationary.

EKO 2009 – redwood, copper, steel base and bell $26,000
Echo refers to the potential sound of the elemental bell. I have a deep intuition that the forces of nature permeate perceived reality. I recall these words of a haiku, “The sound of the cicada penetrates the rock.” So, even rock is permeable. Or “The sound of the water says what I think”. Thank goodness our minds are permeable too. As a sculptor and object maker I live in the physical world of materials. These three sisters are my musings about matter, intuitive compositions, and molecular models using redwood and copper as the building blocks of reality. I’m not splitting the atom or cloning a sheep but spontaneity and intuition may be the compliment of planning and reason.

KOAN 2009 – redwood, copper, steel base – 7’x7’x5’ $24,000
​Koan is defined as a paradox to be meditated upon. The idea is to abandon reason and find intuitive insight. I do not find this sculpture to actually be paradoxical nor do I expect a lightning bolt of insight to strike the viewer but I do hold fast to the idea that insight can occur at any moment. For me, intuition is a better tool of insight than reason.

PHOTON 2009 – redwood, copper, steel base – 5’x6’x4’ $23,000
​Photon is defined as the elementary particle of light. Photon may be the smallest element in this constellation of sculptures. Sculptor James Surles once described one of his sculptures as “being as small as a ray of light and as large as the universe at the same time”. Then he said, “You may not see this as I see it and the person next to you may not see it either but someday somewhere someone will.” Here is the great faith of the artist, that what we make matters.

SLOT CANYON 2014 – redwood, copper, steel base – 10’x10’x12’ $66,000
​There are times and places where I feel alive and connected and at home in the house of being. I often associate these feelings with a place of beauty. Beauty can be the doorway to feeling alive and connected but I am the house of xx being is within and my life is always with me.

I have floated the Grand Canyon four times. What a place of beauty. The deeply etched and narrow side canyons to the Grand Canyon are often called slot canyons. To walk or wade a deep slot canyon to hear the trickle of water reverberate, to touch the slick sidewall or to see a narrow band of blue sky above opens the doorway of being.

The sculpture Slot Canyon is the faint echo of a real slot canyon but the redwood sculpture is nevertheless real. The two redwood sidewalls of Slot Canyon were once one piece of wood. I can feel their kinship. I can enter the narrow space and feel the motion and energy of the wood. The doorway opens, I feel alive. I can forget that I am alive at times but then something happens like the whoosh, whoosh, whoosh of a raven flying overhead and the door opens.

JURA 2014 – redwood, copper, steel base – 9.5’x8’x12’ $66,000
​Jura is the root of the word Jurassic, the age of reptiles. The Jura Mountains in France are where limestone strata from the Jurassic period were first identified. The name “Jura” is derived from the Celtic root “jor”, meaning forest so “Jura” is Forest Mountains.
Jura, the sculpture, is muscular, tactile, primitive and punctuated for exploration. I love the scale and mass and energy of these pieces of redwood and the way they lean and lock together. I gave myself permission to invoke the reptilian and to add textural markings. Copper pegs and rungs also punctuate the sculpture and invite exploration. As sculptor David Smith says, “If the vitality is there, the form will follow.”

TEMPLE BUS STOP 2014 – redwood, copper, concrete – 17’x21’x14’ $90,000​
​The city of Hanover Germany has commissioned unique bus stops designed by well-known architects. Creating a small shelter with a unique identity for public use is an enchanting opportunity. Temple Bus Stop is a small shelter with unique identity for public use. This wide knoll in the garden where Temple Bus Stop stands was created with this sculpture in mind.Large portals with sculptural roofs have been a recurring theme in my work because they engage my vision as a sculptor along with my experience as a builder and my affection for sacred space.The two major redwood “columns” and the charged empty space between them inspired Temple Bus Stop. The columns are both rustic and refined asserting their big rough nature yet revealing eloquent details. The broad temple-like roof bridges the columns and touches the sky while providing shade from the sun and shelter from the rain. The concrete pedestals anchor and elevate the whole and provide a place to congregate.So look around and realize where you are. You are standing on a knoll in a marvelous new sculpture garden surrounded by sculpture. You are in a public space located between a center for arts and a center for healing. May you be refreshed, inspired and rejuvenated.

PRAIRIE CREEK 2014 – redwood, copper, steel base – 9.5’x8’x12’ $66,000
​Prairie Creek is a state park and a watershed with some intact old-growth redwood forest. Prairie Creek is a remnant of a dense and abundant old growth forest ecosystem that stretched from California all the way to Alaska. All of my salvaged redwood once grew in an old growth forest. Prairie Creek, the sculpture, joins two primal chunks of salvaged wood. One chunk feels like narrow hips and leans into the second that feels like wide shoulders giving me the strong primitive impression of a bison. Since feeling is first I begin. From bison I recalled prairie and eastern Montana with the Rockies on the western horizon. I once worked on a log cabin near Browning. I remember the flashing electrical storms at night over the Rockies and distant rumble of thunder. I remember black and almost solid afternoon storm clouds rolling off the mountains and out across the plains. I remember the arrival of sacred rain. Bison, clouds, rain and prairie are all impressions and all strong feelings.As a viewer you will have your own feelings but I assume that I must put feeling into a sculpture if I expect the viewer to get feeling out of the sculpture.

DARK MATTER 2014 – redwood, copper – 8’x7’x6’ $21,000
​My salvaged redwood stumps and roots are the remains of old-growth trees, charismatic mega flora and millennia witness. Dark Matter is one such remnant, a tenacious root that anchored and nourished a great tree. The tree is gone but you can feel the muscular energy of growth. The organic void has been shaped and burned black. A copper block stabilizes the base and copper cylinders punctuate the form and invite exploration. Wood is my collaborator and I am a tool in the process.

TRIO 2014 – redwood, copper – 5’x6’x6’ $18,000
​Trio appears to be the simplest sculpture in this exhibit. Often things that appear simple are not quite as simple as they appear. Often raw salvaged wood needs significant editing. Because the core of Trio was not sound we opened it up and so it no longer collects water. Often a salvaged piece of wood need refining like smoothing rough spots or texturing smooth spots. All of the surfaces of Trio were worked and eventually the entire piece was burned with a torch and brushed and rubbed down to a dark grained finish. Trio was set on a copper base so the wood does not make soil contact. The copper base has on open center so that water and duff does not collect in the middle. These are practical considerations and part of the craft of making exterior wood sculpture.

To make art craft is required but just sanding something smooth is not the same as making something beautiful. Some things are more beautiful rough. Just craft is like getting on the freeway in second gear and just driving and driving. To make art you have to shift.​

SLOW MOTION 2014 – redwood, copper – 4’x10’x4’ $16,000
​Slow Motion is an appropriate title for a sculptural bench – slow down enjoy the garden. As you rest consider this:“ The chainsaw and the bulldozer have reduced the great trees of the Northwest down to objects that a man of average size can fall, load, buck and transport. Today a tree 10’ across at the butt can be felled in ten minutes flat and bucked up in half an hour. A 200-ton tree that has stood, unseen, for a thousand years and withstood wind, fire, floods and earthquakes can be brought to earth, rendered into logs and bound for the sawmill in under and hour – by just 3 men. In 1930 it would have taken a dozen men a day to accomplish the same thing. In 1890 it would have taken them weeks and in 1790 it would have been a matter of months – assuming they were even able to fell the tree.A redwood forest is an abundant ecosystem. 95% of old growth redwoods have been cut and the ecosystem is vanishing. It is time to slow down and protect what is left.

OLAS DE PAZ 2006 – redwood, copper – 8’x12’x6’ $66,000
​Slow Motion is an appropriate title for a sculptural bench – slow down enjoy the garden. As you rest consider this:“ The chainsaw and the bulldozer have reduced the great trees of the Northwest down to objects that a man of average size can fall, load, buck and transport. Today a tree 10’ across at the butt can be felled in ten minutes flat and bucked up in half an hour. A 200-ton tree that has stood, unseen, for a thousand years and withstood wind, fire, floods and earthquakes can be brought to earth, rendered into logs and bound for the sawmill in under and hour – by just 3 men. In 1930 it would have taken a dozen men a day to accomplish the same thing. In 1890 it would have taken them weeks and in 1790 it would have been a matter of months – assuming they were even able to fell the tree.A redwood forest is an abundant ecosystem. 95% of old growth redwoods have been cut and the ecosystem is vanishing. It is time to slow down and protect what is left.